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International and Foreign

Just Security Is Excited to Welcome Five New Editors

 

As we enter our fourth year, Just Security is adding five new members to our Board of Editors, to help us continue to provide informed, thoughtful and nuanced analysis of today’s most pressing national security questions. This outstanding group brings years of experience and expertise to help us navigate the legal nitty gritty and policy implications of a wide range of issues including the Russia investigation, the Trump administration’s expanded use of drone strikes, the new era of cyber and surveillance, the impact of U.S.  continue »

What the FISA Warrants Against Paul Manafort Tell Us About Mueller’s Investigation

 The Trump-Russia saga has more characters than War and Peace and plot twists harder to follow than Game of Thrones. So making sense of the latest news – that the FBI had taken out not one, but two surveillance orders under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) on former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort – can be difficult to put into context.  continue »

Libya’s Haftar and Liability of Superiors: Ordering Offenses v. Responsibility for Omissions

 

Further to Just Security‘s coverage on Tuesday of the potential war crimes liability of U.S citizen/Libyan warlord General Khalifa Haftar, this article discusses the distinction under international criminal law between (1) ordering the commission of offenses and (2) being found liable under the doctrine of superior responsibility for failing to prevent or punish the commission of abuses by subordinates.…   continue »

How Facebook Could Crack the Trump-Russia Case

 

Facebook should be treated like a crime scene. The social media company likely has troves of data that could provide critical leads for the investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government.

The effort to investigate possible coordination between the Trump team and Russia has so far centered on the growing number of meetings and interactions between the campaign and Kremlin-linked figures.…   continue »

Smoking Gun Videos Emerge: US Citizen, Libyan Warlord Haftar Ordering War Crimes

The International Criminal Court very recently issued an arrest warrant for a militia leader in Libya which should catch the attention of U.S. policymakers, diplomats and prosecutors because of the possibility that his most senior commander—an American citizen by the name of Khalifa Haftar—ordered soldiers to commit war crimes.…   continue »

Protecting Civilians Critical to Syria Talks’ Success

 

“They will kill us all,” Ahmad, a Syrian aid worker, told me last month, referring to the many armed parties to the Syrian conflict.

We were talking about Idlib, a province in northwest Syria that is home to around 2 million people, about half of whom are displaced, and is mostly under the control of Hay’et Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), widely acknowledged to be affiliated with al-Qaeda.…   continue »

Climate Change and Arctic Security: Five Key Questions Impacting the Future of Arctic Governance

The day-to-day news cycle focuses on critically important national security issues, such as North Korea saber rattling, the ongoing Russia investigation, or whatever else happens to be the national security topic du jour. This flood of daily national security news makes it difficult to take a step back from the day-to-day news cycle and look at the broader security and geopolitical trends that are taking place—but that is exactly what climate change and its corresponding security impacts demand.…   continue »

Erik Prince’s ‘New Band of Flying Tigers’ is a Sequel We Don’t Need

It shouldn’t be too surprising that in his recent New York Times op-ed calling for an infusion of private contractors into Afghanistan, Erik Prince sidestepped any discussion of Blackwater’s history in Iraq. The company had such a poor record that Prince has changed its name numerous times in the years since: he now is the CEO of the Frontier Services Group.…   continue »