Perjury Chart: Trump Associates’ Lies, False, or Misleading Statements on Russia to Federal Authorities

It is a federal offense to intentionally make false statements to Congress, the FBI, and other federal authorities. It is also a crime to encourage others to do so (that is, in technical terms, to “suborn perjury”). It is also a crime to engage in a conspiracy to lie to federal authorities. A conspiracy can involve a tacit or explicit agreement to commit the criminal activity.

Here is a summary of the 19-page Chart which is below (as a PDF document). It will be updated as new information becomes public. Major updates will be announced on Twitter and Facebook.

1. Jeff Sessions
(1) probably lied to Congress about his communications with Russian government officials and (2) possibly lied to Congress about his knowledge of other campaign members’ contacts with Russian government officials (starting Jan. 2017)
2. Jared Kushner (part 1)
made material omissions on his security clearance forms (January-June 2017)
3. Michael Flynn
lied to the FBI about communications with the Russian ambassador (Jan. 24, 2017)
4. George Papadopoulos
lied to the FBI about his Russian contacts (Jan. 27, 2017)
5. K.T. McFarland
probably lied to Congress about knowledge of Flynn’s phone calls with the Russian ambassador (July 2017)
6. Michael Caputo
probably lied to Congress about his contacts with Russians (July 13, 2017)
7. Jared Kushner (part 2)
(1) probably lied to Congress about his knowledge of the reason for the June 9 Russia meeting in Trump Tower and (2) possibly made false statements about proposing a backchannel to Russia (July 24, 2017)
8. Michael Cohen
lied to Congress about the Moscow Trump Tower Project (Aug. 28, 2017)
9. Donald Trump Jr.
(1) probably lied to Congress about receiving offers of assistance from other foreign governments; (2) probably lied about candidate Trump’s advance knowledge of the June 9 Trump Tower meeting; (3) made a false statement about whether any of the Russian members of the June 9 meeting requested a follow-up; (4) possibly made false statements about the Trump Tower in Moscow deal (Sept. 7, 2017)
10. Roger Stone
(1) probably lied to Congress about how and when he learned of Wikileaks’ possession of Podesta’s emails; (2) probably lied in denying advanced knowledge of any content of Wikileaks’ documents on Hillary Clinton (3) probably lied about his communications with Wikileaks; (4) probably lied about his contacts with Russians; and (5) made false and misleading statements about his communications and relationship to the campaign (Sept. 26, 2017)
11. Carter Page
probably lied to Congress about his contacts with Russian officials (Nov. 2, 2017)
12. Alex van der Zwaan
lied to the FBI about his contacts with Rick Gates and a Ukrainian national with active ties to Russian intelligence (Nov. 3, 2017)
13. Natalia Veselnitskaya
(1) probably lied to Congress about her connections to Russia’s Prosecutor General Yuri Chaika and (2) probably lied about attempted follow-up to the Trump Tower meeting (Nov. 20, 2017)
14. Paul Manafort
lied to federal authorities about his ties to Kremlin-link Ukrainian political parties (starting Nov. 23, 2016, later dates include Feb. 10, 2017)
15. Rick Gates
lied to federal authorities about his ties to Kremlin-link Ukrainian political parties (starting Nov. 23, 2016, later dates include Feb. 10, 2017)
16. Erik Prince
(1) probably lied to Congress about his secret Seychelles meeting with a Russian and (2) probably lied about his relationship to the Trump campaign (Nov. 30, 2017)
17. Robert Goldstone
probably lied to Congress about his email to Donald Trump Jr. (Dec. 15, 2017)
18. Samuel Patten
gave false and misleading testimony related to (1) working, in partnership with a Russian national, as an agent of a Kremlin-linked Ukrainian political party and (2) funneling, in partnership with a Russian national, money of a Ukrainian oligarch to the Presidential Inauguration Committee  (Jan. 2018)
19. Jerome Corsi
probably lied to the FBI about his efforts with Roger Stone to communicate with Wikileaks/Assange (Sept. 6, 2018)

 

The full Chart with supporting information:

View this document on Scribd
 

About the Author(s)

Ryan Goodman

Co-Editor-in-Chief of Just Security, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Professor of Law at New York University School of Law, former Special Counsel to the General Counsel of the Department of Defense (2015-2016). You can follow him on Twitter @rgoodlaw.